Article

Article

TUT and TAMK start teaching co-operation

24.9.2018
This autumn, Teemu Huhtala and Niko Karinen started their studies at TAMK.

This autumn, Teemu Huhtala and Niko Karinen started their studies at TAMK.

From this autumn, TUT’s Bachelor’s Degree Programmes and TAMK’s engineering programmes will have some 80 ECTS credits of common courses.

From this autumn, TUT’s Bachelor’s Degree Programmes and TAMK’s engineering programmes will have some 80 ECTS credits of common courses. The courses have similar contents and learning outcomes and consist of introductory studies in construction and other major subjects.

Teaching co-operation means that the teachers responsible for the same subjects actively liaise with each other and plan the curriculum together. However, students will still continue to study on their own campuses.

“We have known each other for a long time – which is a definite advantage – and have previous experience about educational co-operation. It will help us make the most of our limited resources,” says Jouko Lähteenmäki, head of degree programme from TAMK.

In 2019, educational co-operation will also extend to other fields of study. In addition, there are plans to develop the laboratories of construction by taking into account the needs of both higher education institutions.

The Construction Laboratories, built by TAMK a few years ago, were mainly designed for practical training, whereas TUT offers excellent opportunities for more theoretical studies.

“I hope that teaching co-operation will increase in the future, which would mean intensifying our operations while the lecturers’ expertise would also serve us better than before,” says Matti Pentti, director of the Civil Engineering Laboratory at TUT.

Different learning outcomes considered

Educational co-operation takes into account the different pedagogical requirements and goals of the university and UAS. At TAMK, the main objective of studies is to teach professional skills, and TUT’s Bachelor’s studies prepare for further study.

“The main difference between the two is that we have a deeper understanding of the fundamentals of mathematics and natural sciences at TUT,” Pentti says.

Both institutions are planning to have flexible studies so that students in different life situations may earn their degrees within the target time.

“The main objective of a university of applied sciences is to provide skilled and motivated professionals for a variety of practical jobs in the construction sector. And for some students, a university degree will naturally become easier, if they have already learned many of the skills in accordance with mutually agreed principles,” says Markku Lahtinen, President of TAMK.

Students praise flexibility

This autumn, Teemu Huhtala and Niko Karinen started degree programmes in construction and infrastructure at TAMK. Both had first earned a vocational degree, after which they had gradually started to contemplate the idea of ​​higher education.

“I studied construction at a vocational college. I also worked at building sites, which gave me the idea to continue my studies,” Huhtala says.

After vocational college, Karinen decided to test his luck in entrance examinations. He says that further training will provide better employment prospects in the future.

“I just wanted to see whether I could get in. The studies will help me to earn more money in the future,” Karinen says.

In the everyday life of students, educational co-operation does not make a noticeable difference, but students think that the increasing co-operation also serves their interests. Flexibility helps students to plan their studies.

Anja Salo, lecturer of physics and study counsellor at TAMK, has not yet seen many signs of the co-operation between the two higher education institutions.

“The educational co-operation has emerged in study planning. I have counselled students about education provision at both universities. Students seem to be more aware of their options than before,” Salo says.


Text: Jaakko Kinnunen
Picture: Jonne Renvall